Epazote Magical Properties

Monica Williams 发布

Epazote Medicine and Spiritual Properties

 Epazote

Epazote (pronounced eh-pah-ZOH-teh) is an aromatic herb; both the fresh leaves and tender stems are used in cooking. Used in Mexican cuisine in black beans. The herb is also called one that "Removes air", or gas, the magickal properties are analogous to the medicinal ones. 

Epazote contains a compound called ascaridole that is toxic to parasitic worms. The Mayans used it as an infusion/tea to treat parasite infections.

 

Epazote* (Dysphania ambrosioides)

Planetary Signature: Mercury

Elemental Signature: Air

Parts Used: leaves (cut/ sifted) and essential oil (not recommended—see note!)

 

Folk-Names: Ambroisie de Mexico, Ambroisine, American Goosefoot, American Wormseed, Amerikanisches Wurmsamenkraut, Ansérine Ambroisie, Ansérine Américain, Ansérine Vermifuge, Apazote (Spanish vernacular), Baltimore Wormseed, Bean Herb, Bitter Weed, Caá Ná, Castor, Chenopodio Ambrosia (Italian), Chenopodium Ambrosioides, Citronmålla, Demi-God’s Food, Epazōtl (Nahuatl), Erra Formigueira (Portuguese), Herba Sancti Mariæ, Hierba Hormiguera, Indian Wormweed, Jerusalem Oak, Jesuit Tea, Jesuiten-Tee, Mexican Tea, Mexikanisches Traubenkraut, Oak of Paradise, Paico, Paico Macho, Pasote, Pig Weed, Saitruunasavikka, Sitronmelde, Skunkweed, Spanish Tea, Sweaty Skunk Plant, T’u-ching-chieh (Chinese), Té de España, Té de los Jesuitas, Thé de Jesuits, Wohlriechender Gänsefuss, Worm Grass, Wormbush, Wormweed, Wormwort, Wormseed, Wormseed Oil Plant, Yerba de Santa Maria.

 

Origins

Native to Central America, epazote has been grown for culinary and medicinal purposes for countless generations. This herb is used in everyday cooking in the southern Mexican state of Oaxaca and the Yucatan Peninsula among the Mayan-speaking peoples. Epazote has spread as a weed (growing in empty lots and by roadsides) throughout a large part of North and South America and even into Europe and Asia.

The word epazote derives from Nahuatl, the language spoken by Mexican Aztecs and their ancestors. A literal translation to English would be something like “stinky sweat” (not very appetizing!). In some parts of Mexico and Guatemala, the plant is called pazote, ipasote, apazote, hierba hedionda (“stinky weed”), pazoli, and pizate, In Peru, it is known as paico, a word that comes from Quechua. In English it is sometimes called goosefoot, skunk weed, wormseed, or Mexican tea; the last two of these terms allude to its medicinal use to combat intestinal parasites.

 

Spiritual Properties

This herb is renowned for its ability to neutralize negative energies and forces. This herb is good for Protection, Hex Breaking and Road Opening. A good house cleansing smudge, floor wash and sprinkle outside front door. Used as a smudge/spray in the house with it after situations that are highly stressful for the whole family, like after a family member’s death, after a divorce, etc. A bundle of dry Epazote is a wonderful protection to keep nightmares caused by spirits away, and to protect children from spiritual attacks.

It also removes parasitic energies from around the body. A good bath combo, and incense would be epazote, amamu (guinea hen weed), and angelica.

Epazote seems to have a lemony fragrance for some people and for others a foul one. One of epazote's common names is Sweaty Skunk Plant.

It can be used for business success, all-purpose luck, and even eloquence. In fact, epazote would work well with abre camino herb on Road Opening candles, in R.O. incense and R.O. spiritual baths.

Some root workers have suggested that epazote is an aphrodisiac. That is, encouraging erotic feelings during the act of lovemaking. Use tea form.

Epazote essential oil contains ascaridole (up to 70%), Ascaridole is toxic and has a pungent, not very pleasant flavor. In pure form, it is an *explosive. Use of this oil is *not recommend. (1)

Do not use in any form if pregnant or if you are attempting to become pregnant.

 

Uses:

  • Protection & Hex Breaking- Medicine wise it creates a hostile environment for parasites to live in so spiritually it can do the same for spiritual parasites
  • Road Opening - Epazote Digest the obstacles in life and removes spiritual parasites. It makes a wonderful tool for getting rid of residual negativity. (After big meals it helps to break down and digest foods (breaks down hard-to-digest vegetable proteins thus why spiritually it can help digest obstacles/Road Opening)

 

 

 

 

Works Cited

“Epazote: A Natural Way to Decrease Gas - Amy Burkhart, MD, RD.” Amy Burkhart, MD, RD, 17 Apr. 2021, theceliacmd.com/epazote-a-natural-way-to-decrease-gas/.

https://www.facebook.com/thespruceofficial. “How to Use Epazote Herb.” The Spruce Eats, 2019, www.thespruceeats.com/what-is-epazote-4126810.

“Log into Facebook.” Facebook, www.facebook.com/conjurepilarr/posts/epazotethis-herb-is-renowned-for-its-ability-to-neutralize-negative-energies-and/876659082898260/. Accessed 16 Feb. 2022.

macmorrighan. “Enchanting Epazote.” Wade MacMorrighan, macmorrighan.tumblr.com/post/132198300456/enchanting-epazote?fbclid=IwAR3u2KJq7Bg22c6VM3GLP1z6EDJmHz5AfCGBlD7uKYDoHyKo06PODH05b4U. Accessed 16 Feb. 2022.

“North African Plants – Treasures from the Desert - Raíces Cultural Center.” Raices Cultural Center, 10 Sept. 2012, raicesculturalcenter.org/north-african-plants-treasures-from-the-desert/.

Troy. “I Refuse to Recede: Herb of the Week -- Epazote.” I Refuse to Recede, 29 Oct. 2009, i-refuse-to-recede.blogspot.com/2009/10/herb-of-week-epazote.html?m=1&fbclid=IwAR1fpvfymJN3xKdwanJICjbVI-S448Ng_sik3VXnJwq_fk_yksuvcnhPyHA.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

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